The Edgoose and Related Families'
 Genealogical Project

EDGOOSE, Elmitt

Male 1823 - 1884  (61 years)


Personal Information    |    Media    |    Notes    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name EDGOOSE, Elmitt 
    Born 4 Sep 1823  Gosberton, Lincolnshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Baptism 14 Sep 1823  Gosberton, Lincolnshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Reference Number 407 
    _UID 6109BB0231FF4D0C84AFB2787ADFED479AAD 
    Died 22 Sep 1884  Plaistow, Essex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 29 Sep 1884  West Ham, Essex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I407  Edgoose
    Last Modified 4 Dec 2017 

    Father EDGOOSE, James,   b. 1780, Gosberton, Lincolnshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Jun 1832, Gosberton, Lincolnshire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 52 years) 
    Mother WINFREY, Mary (Winfree),   b. 1785, Long Sutton, Lincolnshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Aug 1862, Leicester, Leicestershire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years) 
    Married 14 Dec 1807  Moulton, Lincolnshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F185  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family MATHEWS, Priscilla,   b. 1824, Drayton, (Berkshire), Oxfordshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 May 1897, Portsmouth, Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years) 
    Married 24 Mar 1856  Enfield, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. EDGOOSE, James,   b. 9 Aug 1856, Plaistow Marsh, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1911  (Age 55 years)
     2. EDGOOSE, Mary,   b. 2 May 1858, Plaistow Marsh, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Jul 1859, Plaistow Marsh, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 1 years)
     3. EDGOOSE, Mary A.,   b. 18 May 1860, Plaistow, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1918, West Ham, Essex Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years)
     4. EDGOOSE, Kerenhappuck,   b. 5 Apr 1863, Poplar, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1942, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years)
     5. EDGOOSE, Arthur,   b. 11 May 1865, Poplar, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Nov 1902, Poplar, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 37 years)
     6. EDGOOSE, Kezia Ann,   b. 4 Feb 1868, Poplar, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Mar 1869, Poplar, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 1 years)
     7. EDGOOSE, Elmitt,   b. 20 Jan 1870, Poplar, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Jan 1870, Poplar, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    Last Modified 11 Jul 2016 
    Family ID F286  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Documents
    Edgoose ElmittEdgoose 407 108.jpg
    Edgoose ElmittEdgoose 407 108.jpg
    ELMITT EDGOOSE (1823-1884)

    He was not at home at the time of the 1861 census. His wife Priscilla was head of the family but married. Is this census enumeration of RG9/1082/ /8 the proof that he was in Chelmsford Gaol? The description fits: aged 38 in 1861, a carpenter, and born at Gosberton, Lincolnshire.

    Edgoose ElmittEdgoose 407 109.jpg
    Edgoose ElmittEdgoose 407 109.jpg
    ELMITT EDGOOSE (1823-1884)

    He was not at home at the time of the 1861 census. His wife Priscilla was head of the family but married. Is this census enumeration of RG9/1082/ /8 the proof that he was in Chelmsford Gaol? The description fits: aged 38 in 1861, a carpenter, and born at Gosberton, Lincolnshire.


    Headstones
    Mathews PriscillaMathews 408 261.jpg
    Mathews PriscillaMathews 408 261.jpg
    Monumental Inscription in Portsea Cemetery, Hampshire:
    IN LOVING MEMORY OF
    THOMAS JOHN
    THE DEARLY BELOVED HUSBAND OF
    PRISCILLA ELIZABETH CAPPER
    WHO DIED OCTOBER 15th. 1923, AGED 77 YEARS.
    R.I.P.

    IN LOVING MEMORY OF
    PRISCILLA ELIZABETH
    THE BELOVED WIFE OF
    THOMAS JOHN CAPPER,
    WHO DIED JULY 22nd. 1907, AGED 58 YEARS

    ALSO PRISCILLA EDGOOSE,
    MOTHER OF THE ABOVE
    WHO DIED MAY 5th. 1897, AGED 69 YEARS.
    R.I.P.

    Historical Directories
    The Directories 4146 Edgoose ElmittEdgoose 407 1882 178.jpg
    The Directories 4146 Edgoose ElmittEdgoose 407 1882 178.jpg
    ELMITT EDGOOSE (1823-1884)

    Address:

    Occupation: fishmonger

    Directory: Post Office London Directory (Part 1: Official & Street Directories)

    Date: 1882

  • Notes 
    • ELMITT EDGOOSE 1823-1884

      Elmitt EDGOOSE was born on 4 September 1823 and baptised at Gosberton, Lincolnshire, on 14 September, son of James and Mary EDGOOSE of Gosberton. His father was described as a yeoman.
      (PR)
      James EDGOOSE had married Mary WINFREE by licence at Moulton, Lincolnshire, on 14 December 1807.

      From the 1841 census returns for Gosberton Risegate:
      Elizabeth EDGOOSE, aged 20, dressmaker, born in Lincolnshire;
      *Elmet (sic) EDGOOSE, aged 15, agricultural labourer, born in Lincolnshire;
      Kezia EDGOOSE, aged 15, born in Lincolnshire;
      Kerenhappuch EDGOOSE, aged 13, born in Lincolnshire;
      John EDGOOSE, aged 10, born in Lincolnshire.
      (HO107/607/11/31)
      Their mother Mary EDGOOSE was elsewhere.

      "- Mrs. HEADGOOSE, of Gosberton, appeared to a summons obtained by Mr. John GREENFIELD, of Gosberton, charging her with having fraudulently removed certain articles from her premises, to prevent her landlord, Mr. GREENFIELD, from destraining (sic) for arrears of rent. - Wm. TWELVES, and Elmet HEADGOOSE, both of Gosberton, also appeared to answer a charge of having assisted in the removal of the goods; and after hearing the complaint of Mr. GREENFIELD, was dismissed."
      (Lincolnshire Chronicle, 7 December 1849)
      (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

      At the time of the 1851 census he was living at Surfleet Risegate:
      Mary EDGOOSE, head, aged 63, widow, born at Long Sutton (she was actually 66 years old);
      *Elmit (sic) EDGOOSE, son, aged 25, agricultural labourer, born at Gosberton, Lincolnshire;
      Kerenhappuck EDGOOSE, daughter, aged 22, milliner and dressmaker, born at Gosberton.
      (HO107/2096/250v)

      "THE JOINERS' STRIKE AT NOTTINGHAM.- INTIMIDATION OF WORKMAN
      .......... In the next information John GREENSMITH was charged with assaulting a journeyman joiner named Elmet EDGOOSE, on the 31st ultimo. Mr. BOWLEY conducted the prosecution and Mr. COWLEY the defence.
      The complainant deposed that between the hours of three and four o'clock on the afternoon in question, he was at the Castle and Falcon, in Warser-gate. The defendant went into the room, and struck him a violent blow on the cheek, saying that he would fight any person in the room. The defendant was drunk at the time, and he did not give him the least provocation to commit the assault. He had promised that no one should harm GREENSMITH whilst in the room.
      By Mr. BOWLEY - He went into the Shoulder of Mutton public-house, where he saw GREENSMITH, who said that he would go to the Castle and Falcon public-house, if it were guaranteed that he should return without injury. Witness undertook that this should be so. When in the Castle and Falcon he did not apply a light to GREENSMITH's hair. He did not see his hair on fire. When he was struck in the face by him, witness said, "You have been quoting Scripture to us a long time, it is now my turn." He then told him it was stated in the Scriptures, "that if a man were struck on the one cheek, that he should turn the other towards him, and tell the aggressor to hit him on that also." He then desired him to strike him on the other cheek, but the defendant did not do so. Witness never heard MARRIOTT say that he would shelve him. He heard MARRIOTT say, "Be a good boy, and go home, John." Defendant was drunk at the time, so much so that he was assisted into a cab at the door. there was no violence offered to GREENSMITH.
      Several witnesses were produced, who corroborated this statement, and the magistrates, after a short consultation, decided that the case was proved, and convicted GREENSMITH in the penalty of 1s., and costs, 1l. 1s. 6d."
      (The Morning Post, 10 June 1854, taken from the Nottingham Journal)

      He married Priscilla PARKER of Enfield Lock, Middlesex, widowed daughter of labourer Joseph MATTHEW, at St. Andrew's, Enfield, on 24 March 1856. He was by now a carpenter. Witnesses were Thomas BOSWELL and Eliza Mant BOSWELL. Priscilla was apparently illiterate and could only make her mark in the register.
      (GRO March Q 1856 Edmonton 3a 116)

      Their first child James EDGOOSE was born at Victoria Dock Terrace, Plaistow Marsh, Essex, on 9 August 1856. Elmitt EDGOOSE gave his occupation as carpenter journeyman.

      Their daughter Mary EDGOOSE was born at 2 Pitt Street, Plaistow Marsh, on 2 May 1858. She died there on 12 July 1859. The informant was Harriett CATTON of 2 Pitt Street, Plaistow Marsh, presumably a lodger.

      Essex Standard, 23 July 1858
      "Alleged False Imprisonment
      EDGOOSE v. JOBLING
      This was an action for assault and false imprisonment at West Ham.
      Mr. Sergeant PARRY and Mr. HAKE for the plaintiff; Mr EDWIN JAMES, Q.C., and Mr. HAWKINS for the defendant.
      Mr. Sergeant PARRY said the plaintiff was a person in humble life - a journeyman carpenter; and was recently in the employ of the defendant, a master builder, at West Ham. In May last year he was given into custody under circumstances that would be given in evidence; but there proved to be no ground whatever for the charge, and he was dismissed.
      Of course to a man in his position character was of the utmost importance; and he asked the Jury to give such damages as would vindicate his reputation.
      The following evidence was adduced: -
      Herbert [sic[ EDGOOSE, the plaintiff, said he was a carpenter, at present in the employ of Messrs. PETO and BETTS; in the spring of this year he was working for the defendant; onthe 14th May there was a dispute between him and the foreman, George PAVIOUR, and he (plaintiff) was discharged; 22s wages were due to him; Mr. JOBLING told him to come on Saturday afternoon at half-past 4 to be paid, and they would see if they could settle it; Mr. JOBLING lived in Buxton Street; he did not know the house, and inquired at a beer-shop in Roscoe Street; not seeing other men waiting to be paid he walked past the house and waited. Mr. JOBLING came after him, and asked him where he was going to; he replied to his house to be paid; Mr. JOBLING said he had been there and taken a bag of money; he denied it, and called Mr. JOBLING a name more true than polite; he asked for his money, but Mr. JOBLING said he should not pay him, and he (plaintiff) and his daughter went towards home, Mr. JOBLING following him with two policemen; when he reached home Mr. JOBLING told the police to take him in charge for stealing 20; plaintiff said it was not true, and Mr.JOBLING would have to pay dear for it; Mr. JOBLING said he thought not, for if he (plaintiff) got through that he would have him for something else; he was taken to Poplar lock-up, a distance of about 2 miles, and the next morning was conveyed handcuffed before a magistrate at Stratford.
      His Lordship said it was wrong to handcuff a man under such circumstances; he supposed there was no idea of an escape or rescue.
      Plaintiff continued. the magistrate said there was no evidence to detain him, and he must either be discharged or held upon his own recognizances. Mr.JOBLING said he did not call that justice, and went again into the witness box, after which the magistrate remanded him, and he was taken to Ilford Gaol, but when brought up again no evidence was given, and he was discharged.
      Cross-examined. Was fined for asaulting the foreman PAVIOUR 3..15 ; worked for the money to pay it; the Magstrates allowed him the money to do so; did not knock at Mr. JOBLING's door, or look in at the window; did not see anyone to ask for his wages; had asked for an advance of a shilling on the Saturday morning.
      Elizabeth PARKER, a little girl, daughter-in-law of the plaintiff, said she recollected one Saturday going with her father for his wages. They found Mr. JOBLING's, but her father said there was no man there, and they turned back and listened to some music. Afterwards Mr. JOBLING came up, and they all went home together. She did not hear Mr. JOBLING charge her father with stealing money. They did not go into Mr. JOBLING's or any other house.
      Mrs. EDGOOSE, wife of the plaintiff, said she remembered Mr. JOBLING coming to her house with two policemen. She was only just down from her confinement, and did not at once go to the door. She saw Mr. JOBLING and Mr. PAVIOUR outside, and heard her husband say, "Come in, master." The policeman asked, "Shall we take him?" and Mr. JOBLING said, "Yes; if he did not have him for that he would for something else." After her husband had been taken away the police came twice and searched the house, including the lodger's room. They searched everywhere, even in the tea-kettle. (laughter.) On the Monday morning Mrs. JOBLING came with one policeman, and made another search. From the time her husband left to go for his wages, till her husband was discharged, she had never spoken to her husband.
      Mary MYERS, who was nursing Mrs. EDGOOSE, proved that plaintiff left home soon after four, and neither him nor the little girl came back until they returned with the policeman and Mr. JOBLING.
      Mr. JAMES here said the plaintiff had never justified the charge of felony; and after the evidence which had been given he was willing to withdraw all imputations, and consent to a verdict of five guineas.
      Sergeant PARRY said the sole object of his client was to clear his character, which he believed would be more effectually done by the withdrawal of all imputations than if the matter had been litigated to the utmost.
      He therefore readily accepted the offer of his learned friend, all imputations being withdrawn.
      Verdict for the plaintiff -
      damages five guineas."

      The Chelmsford Chronicle 23 July 1858:
      "False Imprisonment
      EDGOOSE v. JOBLING
      This was an action for false imprisonment. Mr. SERJEANT PARRY and Mr. HAIGH for the plaintiff; Mr. E. JAMES and Mr. HAWKINS for the defendant.
      Mr. SERJEANT PARRY stated the case. The plaintiff was a journeyman carpenter, and the defendant a builder, at West Ham. The plaintiff was in the defendant's employ, but a quarrel took place between him and the foreman, and he was discharged; on the Saturday night he went to Mr. JOBLING's house to receive his wages, and after he had gone away he was followed and charged with having stolen 19; he was searched; a policeman was sent for, the plaintiff was given into custody, he was taken to Poplar, and locked up till the Monday, when he was taken before a magistrate and eventually discharged. He now sought damages for a grievous injury, unatoned for by even an expression of regret.
      E. EDGOOSE, the plaintiff, proved the dismissal, and his going to the house to be paid the 22s. wages due to him; he did not see the men waiting to be paid, and walked away; he was followed by defendant, who charged him with having been to his house and stolen a bag of money; defendant followed him home, sent for two policemen, and gave him into custody; he was taken through the streets two miles to Poplar station, and locked up till Monday, when he was handcuffed and taken before the magistrates at Stratford, where he was about to be discharged, when defendant got into the box and made a further statement, and he was remanded for a week to Ilford petty session; he was taken to Ilford handcuffed, and at the examination was discharged.
      Cross-examined, He did not go to Jobling's house on the Saturday, as he did not see the men assembled; he might have looked into the window.
      Elizabeth PARKER, a child, daughter of the plaintiff's wife by a former husband, was with her father when he went for his wages on the Saturday, but as the men had not assembled, they did not go to the house, but turned back and stopped to hear some music; she denied having gone into Jobling's house at all.
      Priscilla EDGOOSE, wife of the plaintiff, proved the defendant's coming to her house, with PAVIOR, the foreman, and JOBLING gave him in custody to the policeman, observing, "If I don't have him for that I will for something else." The house was then searched twice, and again on Monday; they even searched the tea-kettle, and got a ladder and went on the roof of the house.
      Sarah SAYERS proved that from the time plaintiff went out to get his wages, till he was given into custody, he never came back to his house.
      Mr. JAMES here said he was instructed by the defendant to say the investigation had removed any impression he might have entertained; he, therefore, withdrew the charge, and consented to a verdict for five guineas.
      Mr. SERJEANT PARRY said the only object of the plaintiff was to vindicate his character, and he accepted the offer.
      His Lordship said, as far as they had gone, there did not seem to be any reasonable ground for the proceeding of the defendant.
      Verdict for plaintiff for five guineas."
      (A similar report appeared in The Times on 23 July 1858)
      (The PRO wrote in March 1999 that the case EDGOOSE v JOBLING was a civil case and that they only held assize records for county criminal cases. The Essex Record Office wrote on 23 March 1999 to say that they held no assize records and had always believed them to be at the PRO).

      Joseph JOBLING, an insolvent carpenter and builder at Plaistow Marshes, applied under the Protection Act. He was opposed by Mr. SARGOOD 'for a person named EDGOOSE' for the damages and costs in an action for false imprisonment. The Court dismissed the petition.
      (The Morning Chronicle, Tuesday, 16 November 1858)

      Their second daughter Mary EDGOOSE was born at 2 Pitt Street, Plaistow Marsh, on 18 May 1860. She married Robert READ in 1879.

      From the 1861 census of Springfield Gaol, Chelmsford, Essex:
      G. E. (which looks likes a mistranscription for E. E.), misdemeanant, aged 38 (i.e born in 1822 or 1823), carpenter, born at Gosberton, Lincolnshire.
      (RG9/1082/67/8)
      His wife and children were still at 2 Pitt Street, West Ham (q.v.).

      Their daughter Kerrenhappuck EDGOOSE was born at 12 Hayfield Cottages, Isle of Dogs, on 5 April 1863. She married Charles HANSEN in 1893.

      Their son Arthur EDGOOSE was born at 12 Hayfield Cottages, Poplar, Middlesex, on 11 May 1865. His mother Priscilla HEADGOOSE gave the father's names as Helmet HEADGOOSE, a carpenter journeyman.

      Kezia Ann EDGOOSE was born at 12 Hayfield Cottages, Poplar, on 4 February 1868. Her mother Priscilla EDGOOSE gave the father's name as James EDGOOSE, a joiner. She died there on 23 March 1869. The informant was E. CAPPER of 9 Davis Terrace, Poplar, and the name of the father was again given as James EDGOOSE, joiner.

      Their son Elmitt EDGOOSE was born prematurely on 20 January 1870 at 12 Hayfield Cottages, Poplar, and lived for only six hours.

      The 1871 census return for 15 (sic) Hayfield Cottages, Poplar, lists Helmet EDGOOSE:
      *Helmet EDGOOSE, head, aged 47, carpenter and joiner, born at Gosberton, Lincolnshire;
      Priscilla EDGOOSE, wife, aged 47, born at Drayton, Oxfordshire;
      James EDGOOSE, son, aged 14, fishmonger, born at Plaistow, Essex;
      Mary EDGOOSE, daughter, aged 10, scholar, born at Plaistow, Essex;
      Kerenhappuck EDGOOSE, daughter, aged 7, scholar, born at Poplar, Middlesex;
      Arthur EDGOOSE, son, aged 5, scholar, born at Poplar, Middlesex.
      (RG10/588/12/17)

      At the time of the 1881 census he was living at 260 Manchester Road, Poplar:
      *Elmitt EDGOOSE, head, aged 57, house carpenter, born at Gosberton;
      Priscilla EDGOOSE, wife, aged 57, born at Oxford, Oxfordshire;
      James EDGOOSE, son, aged 23, fishmonger, born at Canning Town, Essex;
      Kerrenhappuch EDGOOSE, daughter, aged 18, unemployed domestic servant, born at Poplar;
      Arthur EDGOOSE, son, aged 16, unemployed labourer, born at Poplar.
      (RG11/0512/33/3)

      There is a reference to Elmitt EDGOOSE, fishmonger, in the 1882 Post Office London Directory.
      (Part 1: Official & Street Directories)

      He died aged 60 of chronic bronchitis at 59 Whitwell Road, Plaistow, on 22 September 1884. His daughter M.A. READ, of the same address, informed the registrar.
      (GRO September Q 1884 West Ham 4a 96)

      "GOSBERTON. - Sept. 22, in London, Elmitt fourth son of the late Mr. James EDGOOSE, of Gosbertron Cheal, 61."
      (Stamford Mercury, Friday 10 October 1884)
      (www.findmypast.co.uk)

      Ellmett [sic] EDGOOSE was buried on 29 September 1884 in West Ham Cemetery, Essex. The following were buried in the same grave:
      12.03.1968 FRENCH, Minnie
      23.04.1960 FRENCH, Albert H.
      01.12.1926 BASS, George
      22.11.1926 GARDNER, Frederick George
      25.10.1926 TURNER, Fanny
      02.10.1884 BAKER, Jessie
      01.10.1884 WILLIAMS, Annie
      01.10.1884 HITCHCOCK, Henry Barclay
      30.09.1884 TANFIELD, Henry J.
      30.09.1884 SEXTON, Walter W.
      30.09.1884 SEXTON, Mary A.
      30.09.1884 SEXTON, Bartlett James
      (Grave SW/0/35)

      His wife Priscilla died in 1897 at the age of 69.
      (GRO June Q 1897 Portsea 2b 262)


      (revised 04.12.2017)